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Alameda Runners is all about trying to help casual athletes learn more before embarking on your own physical adventures — and to help share information and interviews with companies that you may not be aware of. Injinji, a specialist company focusing on unique socks, is one of those companies I likely would have overlooked — and this article would have never come to fruition — if it wasn’t for Alameda Runners.

I was able to contact Injinji to learn a bit more about the company’s products and why athletes should care. For starters, Injinji’s unique five-toe-sleeve design is patented and was also awarded the American Podiatric Medical Association’s Seal of Acceptance.

“From marathoners to trail runners, mountain bikers to triathletes, Injinji offers a sock for everyone,” an Injinji spokesperson recently told Alameda Runners. “The Performance Series, Injinji’s original and most popular toesock, is ideal for running, walking, cycling, track & field, cross training and other multi-sport activities. Injinji’s Outdoor toesock is perfect for trail running, hiking, trekking, adventure sports and mountain biking.”

The ability to use toesocks along with minimalist footwear, such as the popular Vibram Five Finger shoes, has been a concern for some athletes.  Trying to wear socks with minimalist footwear typically doesn’t work too well, but athletes like having some type of layer of material between their feet and shoes.

“Injinji Performance Toesocks are the perfect complement to VFFs and other minimalist footwear. We recommend Injinji’s Performance Series Liner for minimalist footwear fans. The Liner is an ultra-thin and sleek interface that provides superior moisture and blister protection.”

There are immediate benefits runners and athletes will be able to enjoy if they decide to give these socks a try, according to Injinji.

“Injinji Performance Toesocks are recognized for their ability to provide superior moisture management and healthy digital alignment. The toesocks separate each toe with a thin layer of anti-friction, moisture-wicking CoolMax® fabric. Wearers experience all of the biomechanical benefits of being barefoot, just without the risk of blisters, hot spots and other painful ailments.”

I’ve grown to appreciate the need for a quality pair of running or cycling socks — but Injinji toesocks still look extremely bizarre. Hopefully we’ll be able to give them a proper test this summer, so we’re able to see what all the fuss is about.

You can purchase Injinji products online through the company’s online store or use the Injinji store locator to help find a store around you with Injinji toesocks.

2 Comments so far »

  1. by StRunner10, on February 24 2012 @ 6:45 am

     

    I’ve worn minimalist running shoes for a few year now. I’ve seen the Injinji socks but never gave them a try until last summer. I wear both the VFF’s and Merrell Barefoot’s. I spoke to a runner that was wearing the socks; she recommended them. Also, that day was a very humid day — hot sweaty run. Minimalist running shoes call for not wearing socks; therefore, sometimes the shoes really feel sweaty and the feeling of hot spots can be a concern. Many miles of running in VFF’s for example, makes them smelly. I am now wearing the Injinji socks. They feel great and still retain most of the road/trail feel; be without the sweaty feeling on those humid days.

  2. by WArunner40, on June 21 2013 @ 10:37 am

     

    I second the statement by STRunner10. In seventy plus humidity days in the summer, the thousands of sweat glands are on overdrive when working out. Most minimalist running shoes only have a thin glued on insole then it’s rubber. Sweat just accumulates. That is when swamp foot sets in. This socks work well in soaking up the moisture. There is a increase in foot odor from not wearing socks. Eight people taking off there shoes in a van is not pleasant. Non-minimalist running shoes like a Asics trail runner that this gal was not wearing socks with then was the worst of them all.

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